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Author Topic: Iron Man 2 Reviews and Spoiler Discussions!  (Read 19228 times)
Metal Head
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« on: April 28, 2010, 11:22:16 AM »

Post away! And to our international friends seeing it this week, please don't spoil it elsewhere on the site!!

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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2010, 11:53:16 AM »

I'm a bit underwhelmed by the reviews so far not that any of them are going to stop me from seeing it. Nobody seems to have claimed it an outright disaster so far so that's good. Some of them also don't seem to really get Iron Man so I'm waiting to see some reactions from some more comics educated sources.
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2010, 11:54:09 AM »

I'm a bit underwhelmed by the reviews so far not that any of them are going to stop me from seeing it. Nobody seems to have claimed it an outright disaster so far so that's good. Some of them also don't seem to really get Iron Man so I'm waiting to see some reactions from some more comics educated sources.

Check out this thread as it addresses your comments exactly....
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2010, 10:42:51 AM »

Well I've gotta say that I loved it, probably as much as the first.

I will admit that the first's story is a lot tighter while the second has a lot more going on with its larger cast of characters - I wouldn't say the pacing drags, there's just a lot more to absorb in a short frame of time & I can see how the bigger ensemble & their arcs could be made accountable for this. It also doesn't have the political relevance the first film had. I didn't seem to get affected by that though, I was totally engaged the whole way through.

Downey again nails Stark to a T, and while he makes a return to his ego-tistical, prick-ish ways he still manages to keep us on his side. Rockwells Hammer is in fine form, and does an excellent job of portraying used-car-salesman-turned-weapons-dealer (loved his little Hammer dance at the expo). Scenes with Downey & Rockwell in the first act are worth the price of admission alone. I was pleased to see Faverau given himself increased screen time as Happy - he had some great comedic moments. Scar-Jo is serviceable as Black Widow as was Sam as Fury, but I just didn't feel Gwens turn as Pepper (or the romance between her & Stark) this time round & apart from Vankos/Rourkes initial appearance, he never really came across to me as the uber villain of the piece, which were probably the weakest elements of the film for me.

I'm pleased ILM have really been let off the leash here, because the action sequences are excellent and way more impressive than the original. Whiplashs debut, Tonys Birthday party & the final battle being the standout sequences.

And for the Marvel fans, yeah stay until after the credits...

This sort of film is the reason I go to the cinema, to be thoroughly entertained & to have a decent laugh.

Overall 4.5 out of 5 stars.
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2010, 07:04:15 PM »

Saw it twice in IMAX dmr tonight.
Loved it and enjoyed every minute of it. I agree with Mr Anderson wholeheartedly, about the performances, the film etc... and there are some nice fanboy touches.
Have already booked to see it again on Monday!!!! Grin Grin Grin
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« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2010, 10:08:33 AM »

When I began reading the negative and mixed reviews for Iron Man 2, I started formulating a review in my head, based on what I was expecting.  I had a phrase in my head - "It's better to be a spectacular failure than a mild success."  I was going to talk about how the film strives to be something different, how it focuses on character development over action and plays against the expectations of the mainstream, and though it might not quite work, it's still better than just an efficient summer blockbuster that ticks all the boxes without really aspiring to be anything more memorable.  Sadly, upon seeing the film, I find myself still using that, "It's better to be a spectacular failure than a mild success" analogy, but not in the way I was expecting.

See, Iron Man 2 is not a bad film.  There isn't really anything seriously wrong with it.  It's good, I enjoyed it.  But I've already pretty much forgotten it.  It was an efficient summer blockbuster.  It ticks all the boxes.  It was, well, a mild success. 

But first, the good stuff.  Like in the first film, what really elevates the movie is the strength of the ensemble cast.  And once again, absolutely the star of the show is Robert Downey Jr as Tony Stark.  Even before Iron Man, Robert Downey Jr was one of my favorite actors, and in my opinion he was one of the finest actors of his generation.  He just has so much charm and charisma, he could make two hours of reading the phone book compelling.  And Tony Stark is just the perfect role for him.  Like Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow, it is the perfect outlet for bringing his off-kilter appeal screaming into the mainstream.  His role in Iron Man was a superstar performance, and though it might not be his BEST work from an ac-tor standpoint, it certainly deserves to long stand as his iconic, calling-card signature role that he'll be remembered for, like Indiana Jones is for Harrison Ford or James Bond is for Sean Connery. 

Thankfully, Downey Jr. once again knocks the ball out of the park as Stark in Iron Man 2, starting with what should come to be ranked with the great entrances of cinema.  With "Shoot to Thrill" by AC/DC blaring, Iron Man jumps out of a plane, and the camera follows him as he plummets through the sky.  It's an adreanline rush, the thrill of pure cinema.  Then Iron Man lands, amidst a scene of fireworks and dancing showgirls, the crowd bursting into applause as the suit is removed to reveal Tony Stark in a smart suit (a clever play on James Bond's entrance in Goldfinger - Favreau has said that Stark is the American Bond, after all), and then Stark joins in with the dancing just in time for the big drum-bashing finale.  The crowd goes wild.  It's audacious, it's egomaniacal, and it's totally perfect.  This is a superhero unlike any other we've seen at the movies.

Plenty of reviews have bashed the film for not having Iron Man show up enough.  But let's face it - what made Iron Man so great was that it was a rare instance of the hero being every bit as compelling - if not moreso - when he's out of his costume, such is the appeal of Robert Downey Jr.  I could watch a 2 hour film about Tony Stark going out for a night on the town, with no Iron Man in sight.  Though that's not to say Iron Man doesn't deliver too - I'll get to the spectacular Monaco setpiece in a bit, but right now I'll mark out what was so great about the brawl with War Machine in Stark's home.  It's about the characters first.  Rather than just being "Okay, now we stop the story to have a fight scene", it grows organically out of the scene and the characters.  Tony Stark drunkenly dancing and pissing himself in his costume naturally extends to him getting reckless and putting his guests in danger, which in turn naturally segues into getting into a drunken brawl with Rhodey.  And that's what's so fun about the fight.  It's correographed like a sluggish drunken brawl - only with guys in suits of armor.  Hilarious.

But it's not all style and no substance for Mr. Stark.  His showmanship is undercut by this great sense of sadness, loneliness, and even a sense of inadequacy when compared to his father, and a growing sense of desperation over his time running out, the very technology that saved his life slowly killing him.  There is a whole lot of pathos in the moment where Stark asks Natasha, "What if this was the last birthday you'd ever have?"  Tony Stark is a character with layers and nuances, self-destructive and stubborn, a flawed hero who's problems aren't neatly resolved by film's end.  We get a sense his development is ongoing.

But enough gushing about Robert Downey Jr.  I think the point I'm making is clear.  A much worse film than Iron Man 2 could have been single-handedly kept afloat purely by the awesomeness of Downey Jr's Stark.  But thankfully, this film has more to recommend it.

If it weren't for the magnetic lead, Sam Rockwell would come perilously close to stealing the show as Justin Hammer.  For many years, I've recognized Sam Rockwell as a fantastic talent, long criminally underrated, but thankfully starting to get some well-deserved recognition now.  Empire Magazine calls him The 27%er, in that he makes any film he appears in at least 27% better.  And Iron Man 2 is no exception.  Rumor has it that Rockwell was Favreau's back-up to play Tony Stark should the studios have balked on Robert Downey Jr, so it's oddly appropriate that Rockwell play this odious, cringing funhouse mirror image of Stark.  Hammer works hard at the coolness and the wit that comes naturally to Stark - it's a studied charm, a false charisma.  And while Stark is a genius, Hammer's technology falls apart and is frequently ineffective.  Even the girl on his arm is the one Stark already bedded in the last film.  Try as he might, Justin Hammer just can't be Tony Stark.

In this way, perhaps even moreso than Rourke's Vanko, Justin Hammer just might be the perfect nemesis for Stark.  I would certainly love to see Sam Rockwell return to the role in the future.  He is the best thing in just about every scene he's in, making Hammer funny and almost likeable - until the mask drops and he reveals his nasty true colors in one scene later on in the movie. 

Not that the other villain is any slouch.  The first film had the legendary Jeff Bridges as the bad guy, so to keep up the high standard, the sequel got Sam Rockwell AND Mickey Rourke.  Good luck keeping that momentum going in film 3.  If Hammer is the funhouse mirror reflection of Stark, then Ivan Vanko is the opposite side of the same coin.  A genius who built his revolutionary technology with limited resources, only without the moral awakening Stark benefitted from - as much his father's son as Stark is.  Mickey Rourke has long been a precocious talent, his screen presence walking the fine line between magnetic and awkward.  When that abrasive, edgy persona of his is focused - like in Sin City and The Wrestler - the results are extraordinary.  Here he is not quite so successful, but it's no disaster either.  Rourke doesn't seem to be obviously phoning it in as he does sometimes when the material doesn't compel him.  It's clear he's taking the role of Whiplash seriously, and as such he brings a palpable sense of danger and coiled-up fury into his characterisation. 

Much of the film's first act is anchored by the inevitable collision course brewing between Vanko and Stark - Stark's excess and glamorous high life balanced against Vanko losing that which he holds dearest, and fighting his way up from the gutter to strike out against the only person left to blame for a whole lifetime of anguish, bitterness and percieved injustice ("That should be you up there", his dying father tells him as they watch Tony Stark on TV).  It all comes to a head on the Monaco race track, the most thrilling action set-piece of the movie.  I silently commended Favreau for setting up a different villain dynamic than just "bad guy in a bigger suit of armor."  But it turns out I was a bit premature. 

After this intense battle, we get an equally intense verbal confrontation between Robert Downey Jr and Mickey Rourke - one of those great examples of two actors just owning the screen and generating explosive chemistry - but then Vanko spends over an hour just sitting around, in various locations.  And when he does come back towards the end, it's as - sigh - a bad guy in a bigger suit of armor.  And oddly, he feels less threatening in this instance than he did on the Monaco race track.  I cited the same problem with Jeff Bridges as Obidiah Stane VS Iron Monger, or indeed Tim Roth as Emil Blonsky VS Abomination.  A great actor is always going to make for a more compelling bad guy than a special effect will.

As for the rest of the cast, Gwyneth Paltrow continues to shine as Pepper Potts.  Too often the female leads in superhero films are simpering damsels in distress, but Pepper Potts is the perfect foil for Tony Stark, and actually feels like his match.  They actually have a good chemistry when on-screen together, with the back-and-forth line exchanges - so that we don't actually view these "lovey dovey" scenes as the boring lowpoint of the film, just padding in space until we get to the good stuff.  And as struggling CEO this time round, Paltrow gets to explore new territory - including hints of ambition from someone so long known for her selflessness, interestingly - rather than just rehashing what she did in the first film.  Don Cheadle makes for a better Rhodey than Terrence Howard, so I for one was happy with the changeover.  Funnily enough, though, despite getting to become War Machine in this film, Rhodey isn't given all that much more to do in this film than he was in the first one.  Samuel L. Jackson essentially just plays Nick Fury as Samuel L. Jackson, but I happen to find the Samuel L. Jackson on-screen persona consistently entertaining, so I didn't really mind that.  And in a brief cameo, John Slattery brings a good serving of his Roger Sterling from Mad Men cool to Howard Stark, making him a perfect choice to play Tony Stark's dad.

I don't really buy the whole "building towards The Avengers hurts this movie" argument, as there is in fact comparatively little overt building to that movie here - most plot developments, apart from a certain "New Mexico incident", all link back to what's going on in Iron Man 2.  But the inclusion of Black Widow was to me a clear instance of "one character too many" syndrome.  Yes, Scarlett Johanssen does kick ass in her one big fight scene, as glimpsed in the trailers.  But even that feels contrived, as if it was shoehorned into the movie just to give her character SOMETHING to do.  Aside from that, Black Widow (who is never actually called that in the film) does little other than stand around and cast furtive glances. 

But in spite of all that there is to like about the film, it feels like a lot of likeable bits and pieces, rather than an impressive whole.  The plot itself is rather messy, some hashed together set pieces seperated by a bunch of aimless driving around.  Actually, I find my conclusion about the movie to be rather similar to what my thoughts were on the first film: the plot is fairly pedestrian and unremarkable, but the strength of the acting - particularly from Robert Downey Jr - makes the film much more than the sum of its parts.  I don't know if it was because the plotting was tighter in the first film, or just because back then there was more of a novelty factor, but I just feel that Iron Man pulled off that formula more effectively than Iron Man 2 did.  Still a good film, though.

***/*****
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Mr_Fabulous
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« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2010, 10:21:26 AM »

WORDS

OK, it turns out I came into this thread to say exactly this.
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« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2010, 10:45:56 PM »

I got to see an advanced screening tonight and I loved it.

I agree with most of the comments above. I think it was a very solid movie, and a great sequel to the first one. When I read some of the reviews on rottentomatoes.com, I wonder If we saw the same movie - because I thought it was absolutely excellent.

My one and only gripe was that War Machine didn't use the dual missle pods like the Hot Toys figure.
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ROB JAN
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« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2010, 06:06:59 PM »

This was my online review over at 3RRR FM's website...

Iron Man 2
Film

Rob Jan

My fellow Masked Avengers joked, "You must be hanging out for Iron Man 2...." Well, yes and no. It's not like the gap between Lord Of The Rings 1 and 2. Between Iron Man flicks I've had two years worth of I.M related comics (and that's a LOT, with Tony Stark being the lynchable pin of the Marvel comic universe - he's been busy!), watched four animated movies where Stark / I.M was the main or a major player, seen three t.v cartoon series (I.M Armoured Adventures starring Teen Tony, the re-released on DVD mid-1990s animated series, and - guilty pleasure - the juvenile but slyly amusing Superhero Squad), had the first film to watch over on DVD, and of course seen the cameo at the end of the second Hulk movie where Stark offers to assist the Army with a certain Greenskinned problem.

And there have been an evil amount of....toys. Superman has his generally unchanging iconic costume but Stark upgrades his tin tuxedo frequently, creating so many new action figure variants that I reckon Stark funds his new Iron Man suits from licensed toy sales profits alone!

I'm saying that I haven't exactly been lacking iron in my diet....y'know?

Still, considering that the first film was my favourite superhero movie that's reason enough to be a little bit excited: as another armoured character once said, "Such is geek life..."

Enough of me, let's talk about billionaire industrialist, genius inventor Tony Stark and his film...

Well, by way of director Jon Favreau, who helmed I.M 1, and also wears an actorly hat as Stark's long suffering but loyal chauffeur, ex-boxer 'Happy' Hogan. I first took notice of Favreau's work when I saw the efficiently directed space based movie, Zathura, sequel to the board game fantasy film, Jumanji. He went on to knock my jet boots off with his take on Iron Man.

This time, he's partnered with screenwriter Justin Theroux. Nephew of travel story author, Paul Theroux, and cousin of Louis Theroux, the man behind those madcap BBC documentaries about selected U.S American weirdness. Justin is also an actor/director whose work includes Six Feet Under and Mulholland Drive. As a writer he created the script for Tropic Thunder, for which Robert Downey Jr (the definitive Tony Stark) recommended him for Iron Man.

Favreau and Theroux together succeed in well and truly capturing the spirit of the long running Iron Man comic book character, which stretches back to the first appearance in Tales Of Suspense in 1963. Since Tony Stark changes his armour the way other people change socks it's appropriate that Iron Man 2.0 as a film is a different 'suit' to its predecessor. However, I think that all the plates still fit together, articulate well, and indeed kick appropriate arse when required.

Now, there's a lot going on beneath the surface of Iron Man's formidable faceplate in this movie so I'll pop the visor for those of you who aren't in the know.

Comic book creators often relate that their characters are partly classical gods made over for modern times. However, Tony Stark is not just a 21st Century equivalent of the metalforging Vulcan/Hephaestus. Nor even is he Prometheus cheekily nicking fire from his fellow gods to give to Mankind. No, Stark represents humanity's own creative cleverness, beholden to no fictional sky bully, yanking Mankind up by its own notional bootstraps by sheer invention driven by necessity and the pleasure that comes from 'making stuff'. All the more remarkably self made given that the Marvel Comic Universe is full of mutants, radioactive insects, sorcery and indeed, superpowered beings who embody fictional gods; such as Stark's sometimes drinking buddy and Avenger's teammate, Thor, Asgardian god of thunder.

Students of I.M comics know that Tony's journey as a hero has been a troubled one and that the man beneath the metal is 'iron-ically' the most vulnerable of characters. It's no surprise that this second film owes a lot to the classic 1979 Demon In A Bottle comic book story arc that saw Stark brought to his metal clad knees by alcoholism.

Mostly, commentators allude to Robert Downey Jr's battle with substance abuse as informing his portrayal of the Tony Stark character, but generally overlook the actor's demonstrated dedication to his craft which also saw him astonishingly 'inhabit' Charlie Chaplin, Sherlock Holmes, Lionel 'Fur' Sweeney, and, yes, even Tropic Thunder's wincingly obsessive Kirk Lazarus. That Downey 'gets' Stark's core warrior-artist character, is fascinatingly realised in both films with key extended scenes of Stark playing at work in his amazing armoury. (Although one missed trick from the comics might have been for him to do some heavy duty redecorating of his workshop while wearing his armour...)

There's more. I've complained that recent U.S films rely too heavily upon father/son issues but I waive that gripe for I.M because the character's history predates the current cliche by decades and because it's handled well here and presents new angles. I.M 2 also incorporates the parallel and entangled stories of two sets of fathers and sons, who both more or less find surrogate fathers who are either up to the job or not. I'll leave it to the movie to fill you in on the details!

Tony Stark publicly declared at the end of Iron Man 1, 'I am Iron Man', eliminating the super-hero tradition of a secret identity at the outset. It's been a bemusing device in the comics, though it took several decades for Stark to 'out' himself in the four coloured paper world. Because Iron Man was notionally Stark's bodyguard the ruse didn't protect his friends and colleagues, since anyone who came gunning for Stark or Iron Man inevitably rained unpleasantness on the same parade.

Only Tony Stark thinks that it's all about him (and even he knows better!) so this film is also a solid ensemble piece (rather like the I.M comics have been at arguably the best of times) with characters like superspies Nick Fury and the beautifully deadly Black Widow, Stark's B.F James Rhodes, the villainous Whiplash, and rival industrialist Justin Hammer being brought to cinematic life with varying degrees of success. Samuel L. Jackson is Nick Fury, chief of the spy agency S.H.I.E.L.D, and though he plays it with characteristic cool he's also got a pivotal role setting things up for the future Marvel Avengers superhero team movie.

Stark's armour embodies the eternal arms race between offence and defence and everyone wants a piece of it. You just know that Air Force Colonel Rhodes is going to clash with Tony's first film pledge to steer his company away from arms manufacturing. (Amusingly, in the comics, Stark served as U.S Secretary of Defence for a time.) Much is made of Rhodey's traditional exasperated disagreement with Stark, while actor Don Cheadle replaces Terrence Howard from the first film in the role in as neat a substitution as I could want. And this time, to nobody's surprise, he gets to crank up the buff War Machine armour. 'Nuff said!

Stark gets by with a lot of help from his friends. There are some sweet scenes involving Pepper Potts (blame Marvel legend Stan Lee for the alliterative names!), Happy and Rhodey that are obviously inspired by the comics. Great to see the director is not shy of playing his own character for laughs. Oh, and Favreau's actorly method of encouraging improvised dialogue again pays dividends, as the bantering interplay strikes sparks like a good screwball comedy. Now and then RDJ knowingly pitches it too hard which entirely fits Stark's overwound nervous wit. Gwyneth (Pepper) Paltrow's function as Stark's executive 2.I.C is expanded, which is just as well because she's sharing screen time with a strong ensemble cast.

Iron Man/ Stark's foes include Sam Rockwell as the Tony Stark corporate wannabee, Justin Hammer. Rockwell occasionally channels Zaphod Beeblebrox from the Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy with just a hint of Zorg, the psychotic arms merchant from the Fifth Element. Hammer is a tackier version of Tony, which is saying something!

Mickey Rourke speaks volumes in broken English as a Russian version of Whiplash, a vengeful villain who is a composite of several comic book enemies, including the Crimson Dynamo, Blacklash and, well, several other Whiplashy types. His tech saavy, repulsor whip cracking character is a credit to method acting, in as threatening a role as he's ever played. It's a shame he never physically meets Scarlett Johansson's Black Widow character in the film, I'm sure they'd have fun sharing "Moose and Squirrel" Boris and Natasha lines...actually, the Widow doesn't have a wobbly Russian accent in this film. She's a smart spy! Also an awesomely catsuited martial artist, whose fighting style is spectacularly informed by Mexican wrestling.

Stark invents some 'Transformer' like technology in this film. For the record, Iron Man's use of the tech pre-dates the popular morphing robots. Pop culture wise, as with the first film, product placement seems strangely appropriate to Stark's cashed up lifestyle..so wrong, but so right! ("Which wrist watch shall you wear tonight Mr Stark?" Strewth!)

Musically, Favreau wisely cheats us of the perhaps too obvious Black Sabbath Iron Man riff ("Has he lost control?") in favour of his preferred hard rockin' choice, AC/DC. This sat well enough with me, even though in true Big Bang Theory geek fashion I knew nothing about their work before this film. (Something of an achievement for an Aussie broadcaster!) Though it was also fun to hear other groups featured alongside some sturdily workmanlike action film riffs by John Debney.

With the film's many satisfying 'in-joke' nods to Marvel comics fans in general and 'ferrophiles' (I.M buffs) in particular, I probably don't need to tell you to stay until after the credits for the final Easter Egg that alludes to another upcoming Marvel movie.

I got a lot out of Iron Man Two, but then I lugged a lot of baggage into the cinema! My good vibe is that of any literary devotee who sees their favourite work adapted, and adapted well..twice!

I am STILL Iron Fan!

Oh, and here's the podcast of that episode....sans copyright music of course...

http://rrrfm.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=611354#
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« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2010, 01:01:39 PM »

Rob, did you notice Stan Lee's cameo? It was about as quickly cut as it was in Spider-Man 2....
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« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2010, 03:46:04 PM »

Of course IMJ. "Larry King", heh! Funny, looked a lot like "Hef" to me... Roll Eyes

Just as quick as the glimpse we got of Bambi as Tony pushes his way into Pepper's office.... Cheesy
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« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2010, 02:17:17 AM »

Ok the Movie was great. I thought the pacing was well done I was afraid after reading some reviews that the middle section would drag, to me they I kinda wished it was a bit longer with more of Tony's issue and more with maybe a scene with just widow and fury... the interaction between hammer and vanko was really well done and subtle you could see that Hammer always thought he had the upper hand and treated Vanko like a tool... And Vanko allowed him to think this throughout the Movie.

I loved how Hammer's stuff was so broken it was funny.

The Movie did not however have the impact of the first one ... the first one was about Tony growing up (to an extent) and becoming changed or self aware. This movie was more about Tony understanding his role When faced with death he reverted back to juvenile Tony as a defense mechanism to avoid facing the problem.  I also felt the betrayal of Stane in the first movie made him overall a better villain... However having Vanko actually being technically nearly the equal of Tony made him interesting.

I think Rockwell was brilliant in his role the I wanna be like Tony so much that because I will never be able to so he needs to be brought down was extremely well done.


Now for the negatives I thought the verbal play between pepper and Tony felt forced at times it didn't seem as natural as the first movie.

I disliked how the solution to the poisoning problem was discovered as well . I also wish Stan Lee's Cameo would have been more. Anyone that ever listens to a SL interview knows he drips with personality and i think giving him a line should be the minimum.

So overall I don't have the same feeling I got from the firt Movie but I would highly recommend this movie even to non Ironman fans
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« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2010, 02:53:37 AM »

I saw it and loved it. I have some issues, mostly that their ad libbing at one point took me out of the movie, and started to feel like it was too much out of context.

But overall, I really loved it. I saw it in IMAX at 12:01 AM, but saw the first film at 9 PM digitally in a nice big theater. It was the first time in 2 years that I saw it in a theater. I only saw Iron Man in theaters once (opening day at 1 PM) because of the schedule of a film I was working on.

heath
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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2010, 09:09:51 AM »

Saw it @ 12:01am in the local Metroplex with my son. Did we enjoy it... Heck Yeah! Were there issues? Minor ones. As great as the first? Almost, but not quite. Most importantly, was it a positive portrayal and meaningful addition to the Iron Man mythos? A resounding YES!
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« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2010, 09:27:40 AM »

I've got to really think about the position I want to take on the movie here.

Of course IMJ. "Larry King", heh! Funny, looked a lot like "Hef" to me... Roll Eyes

Just as quick as the glimpse we got of Bambi as Tony pushes his way into Pepper's office.... Cheesy

That, and did you notice who Pepper was talking to on the phone during that scene? Anyone?
She said "Burt"! Stark's lead attorney from the comics during the Abrogast era!
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